Korean Vocab Power Up #1 / 협찬 = sponsorship

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This episode of Korean Vocab Power Up is brought to you by our partner company TheHallyu.com (http://tinyurl.com/bneotdt) and is about the Korean word 협찬 [hyeop-chan], which means “sponsorship”, usually in a context related to broadcasting. When a TV show is filmed on a private property, the place might be “offered” to the team and that is 장소 협찬. When there are some costumes made available for the show, it’s called 의상 협찬. Since entertainers on TV always need a lot of new clothes, they usually always have 의상 협찬 rather than buying and wearing their own clothes.

In this series, we will introduce one word each time and then also introduce some more useful, related expressions. To improve your Korean vocabulary, click here to use our My Weekly Korean Vocabulary subscription!

Click here to check it out:
http://mykoreanstore.myshopify.com/collections/my-weekly-korean-vocabulary

 

Korean Vocab Power Up #1 / 협찬 = sponsorship
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  • jessica bremer

    wow, this was very informative! thanks for this series, guys!
    I’ll be watching every episode 🙂

  • laubis

    협찬 and its variations, are already quite intermediate level words so it makes sense to accompany the introduction of this word with more Korean. By the time learners can use this vocabulary they will also appreciate more Korean listening exercise. Now the lesson is easier to follow for absolute beginners, but also rather pointless, they will need a couple of months of study before they can actually use it.

    TTMIK offers advanced lessons that are only in Korean and beginner episodes, with 99% English and 1% Korean, but not much in between unfortunately.
    My advice for the team is this: please make some lessons to fill that gap, a 80% Korean conversation with 20% hints and explanation in English. I’m sure you’ve done a lot of thinking and research about this already, anyhow, maybe the following link can give you an idea of how such a concept is worked out really well: http://popupchinese.com/lessons/quiz-night/welcome-to-the-quiz-show (feel free to edit my comment if you don’t like links to other language learning sites, even though it is Chinese)

    Best regards,

    Laubis

    • Thanks Laubis for your feedback and letting me know the website link.

      I will share your opinion with other staffs. 🙂

  • Hi all teachers,

    협찬 and its variations, are already quite intermediate level words so it makes sense to accompany the introduction of this word with more Korean. By the time learners can use this vocabulary they will also appreciate more Korean listening exercise. Now the lesson is easier to follow for absolute beginners, but also rather pointless, they will need a couple of months of study before they can actually use it.

    TTMIK offers advanced lessons that are only in Korean and beginner episodes, with 99% English and 1% Korean, but not much in between unfortunately.
    My advice for the team is this: please make some lessons to fill that gap, a 80% Korean conversation with 20% hints and explanation in English. I’m sure you’ve done a lot of thinking and research about this already, anyhow, maybe the following link can give you an idea of how such a concept is worked out really well: http://popupchinese.com/lessons/quiz-night/welcome-to-the-quiz-show (feel free to edit my comment if you don’t like links to other language learning sites, even though it is Chinese)

    Best regards,

    Laubis

  • Frankie

    My apologies if this is a silly question – I have only just started learning. Why is this word hyeop-chan and not hyeob-chan? I don’t understand when ㅂ is a ‘b’ or a ‘p’.

    • Nur Syafinaz

      It’s just a matter of pronounciation. Forgive me if I’m wrong. I’m still in beginner level too ;).

    • Andrey

      consonants like ‘ㅂ’ or ‘ㄱ’ or ‘ㄷ’ are voiced, when they placed between vowels or after the ‘ㅇ’, ‘ㄹ’, ‘ㅁ’, ‘ㄴ’.
      If the word starts with ㅂ, or ends with it (i.e. it’s the last letter in the syllable), or you have another consonant following – you say ‘p’.

  • ismailsadi

    the download link in this page goes to http://traffic.libsyn.com/talktomeinkorean/KoreanVocabularywithPictures-16.mp4
    i think that is KVP not KVPU

  • jr

    i think of something about talking about that i listen to in the videos of
    (talktomeinkorean)

  • jr

    i hope you will see this again the korean power up right now or next
    week