Level 1 Lesson 4 / I’m sorry, Excuse me / 죄송합니다, 저기요

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After listening to this lesson, you can say “I’m sorry.” or “Excuse me.” in Korean. You will also learn how to say “Excuse me. Let me pass.” when you have to walk through a crowd of people. While it is simple to memorize just one phrase for each case, it is not so simple after all because even the same expression cannot always be applied to the same situation between English and Korean. Want to find out why? Listen in now!

You can download a free PDF for this lesson here, or if you want to study with our TalkToMeInKorean textbooks, you can get them here. And after you learn the basics, try writing your own Korean sentences and get corrections from native speakers through HaruKorean, our 1:1 correction service.

  • Boonrod Lasubua

    I’m not understand about 죄송합니다. It’s never mean ‘I’m sorry to hear that’. What’s word in korean means that?

    • Hoàng Anh Lê

      진짜,어떻게? I hear that they say these words. Right?

  • nonik

    what about “excuse me” when you are in class room and wanna get attention to your teacher and ask something?

    • Cecille Mekitpekit


  • Lexi

    What about “mian hamnida”/ 미안 합니다 ?? That is how I learned to say I’m sorry.

    • Xxxx

      i think mian is an informal sorry that comes from the informal word “mianhe” and hamnida means i do or i’m

    • Varvino

      미아하다 = to be sorry (informal like you said, aswell as in the podcast).
      합니다 = uttermost polite (conjugated) version of 하다 = to do

  • Gita Prima

    what is the different between biyane, biyanata, gumawo, and gumampta? (i do not know how to write it in hangeul, i just heard it for many times in korean drama)

    • Alma Johansson

      biyane- I think you mean mianhae, means sorry (informal way of saying sorry)

      biyanata- mianhada? it’s the root word for I’m sorry, and it’s formal (i think)

      gomawo and gomapta are both informal ways of saying thank you.

      The most formal way to say thank you would be gamsahamnida and gomapseumnida.

      Less formal (still formal tho) would be to add “yo” : gamsahaeyo and gomaweoyo.

  • Naomi

    Gamsahapnida for the lessons! They’ re so helpful! Thank you so much!

  • Baruna Riotama

    Thank you very much for the lessons! I’m a newbie and I find this very helpful.
    I have a question, however. what does siillyeseumnida mean? can we take that as ‘excuse me’ too?

  • Yeo Wool

    So you were talking about how the last consonant was dropped. Does that mean that korea hangug would actually be pronounced ha gu? Or ham gu?

  • BrazilianELFIsa

    I don’t know if you already answered this, but what do we say to mean “I’m sorry” when someone loses a person?

  • Shane Whitley

    I am wondering if jam-si-man-yo can also be used literally. For example, if I am busy doing something and someone else says to me “jeo-gi-yo”, can I respond with jam-si-man-yo to mean wait a second, or I’ll be with you in a moment?

    • mjchoi

      Yeah! Exactly. Someone can use 잠시만요 (jam-si-man-yo) as a response to 저기요 (jeo-gi-yo). Happens a lot in Korean restaurants.

  • Chun Shuo

    regarding the pronunciation of hap-ni-da and ham-ni-da which is the most correct one?

    • Lois Williams

      because the “B” sound is not aspirated (breath out air out after saying the letter), it sounds more like an “M” sound than a “B”, so it is closer to ham-ni-da pronunciation-wise.

    • adam


  • Marine

    Hi ! Thanks for the lessons !
    I just wanted to be sure, in this lesson on the PDF page 2, for the 1st sentence and the 2nd one: “When you are passing through a crowd of people” and “when you are leaving the room for a second”. You can say : joe-song-hap-ni-da, jam-si-man-yo and jam-kkan-man-yo? Can’t I ??
    Thank you very much !!!

  • liam

    anyong assao

  • Rebeca Pereira

    Wooooow! Esse é mais dificil! =D