Level 1 Lesson 2 / Yes, No, What? / 네, 아니요, 네?

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After listening to this lesson, when you are asked a YES/NO question, you will be able to answer that question with either YES or NO in Korean.



네. [ne] = Yes.
아니요. [aniyo] = No.

But in Korean, when people say “네”, it is not the same as saying “Yes.” in English. The same goes for “아니요” too. This is because the Korean “네” expresses your “agreement” to what the other person said. And “아니요” expresses your “disagreement” or “denial” to what the other person said.


You can view the PDF here or download it here, or if you want to study with our TalkToMeInKorean textbooks, you can get them here. And after you learn the basics, try writing your own Korean sentences and get corrections from native speakers through HaruKorean, our 1:1 correction service.


  • Thu Thuy

    안녕하세요 :)
    감사합니다 for this lesson :) It’s a little bit confusing but understandable :)) The funny thing is “네” is the informal way of saying “No” in German. xD
    And 커피 좋아햬요. :)

    • Seokjin Jin

      ㅎㅎㅎㅎ Wow, that’s intersting! I learned another German today.

    • Alicia

      You’re German? *-*

    • Thu Thuy

      No, I’m Vietnamese but I was born in Germany :)

    • misaki

      I live in germany and you ?

    • Thu Thuy

      I also live in Germany :)

    • misaki

      Darf ich fragen welche Region ? XD

    • Thu Thuy

      ich komme aus Halle (Saale) in Sachsen-Anhalt :)
      du? :)

    • misaki

      Schade :/ Hannover^^

  • Senjougahara

    I think the proper response to a negatively framed question isn’t as cut and dry as presented.
    Although “No, I do like coffee” sounds a little strange to the question “Don’t you like coffee”,
    it’s not that strange of a response to “Do you /not/ like coffee”.

    I’ve always interpreted “Don’t you X?”/”Aren’t you X?”/etc. constructions as an indicator that the speaker believes X to be true but is asking for confirmation. These constructions are used so often, the literal meaning of the negative has been lost. In other words, “Don’t you like coffee” is logically equivalent to “Do you like coffee” + the nuance of the speaker expecting the confirmation “I do like coffee”.

    However, If someone were to ask “Do you not like coffee”, and the response was only
    “Yes” or “No”, that would be slightly ambiguous, especially with longer questions. I remember many times witnessing that situation, and many people wind up saying “Wait…does that mean you do or don’t X”.

    Also fun fact:
    Pre-15th Century, “yes” and “no” were only used when answering negative questions:
    “Do you not like coffee?”
    “Yes, I do” or “no, I do not”

    For positive questions, there were (the now obsolete) “yea” (pronounced “yay”) and “nay”
    “Do you like coffee?”
    “Yea, I do” or “nay, I do not”

    • asdaf

      pretty interesting with the yes/no yay/nay, thanks